4 replies, 3 voices Last updated by Joy Freeman 1 year, 4 months ago
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    • #6068

      Laura Broadwater
      Participant
      @Laura

      I appreciate ritual whether those are spiritual rituals or daily touchstones which bring about a moment in the day to refresh, refocus, renew the mind, body, and spirit.  This presentation brought about thoughts I had not considered.  We are a culture in fight and flight.  I truly comprehend this manifestation in our daily lives with the current pandemic.  I read it in social media and hear this lower level of blame game in the news.   I had not considered the three levels that were presented in such a clear fashion.

      Gratefulness, reframing thoughts help me process trauma and I find help others process trauma.  This pandemic has been traumatizing for for many families, generations of families live in one household.  One person getting sick, everyone getting sick, it is a struggle with multiple family members hospitalized.  Then if one member dies, there is great grief and great fear, the “would of, could of, should of” process begins.  There is a narrow vision and being absorbed in this process of going over the story trying to find meaning and purpose for suffering seem to replay the traumatic event.  I appreciate the suggestion to tweak situations to reframe scenarios to draw in faith ritual helping people process trauma lessening the power of the situation while empowering the person.

    • #6096

      Deanna Stringer
      Participant
      @dstringer

      Hi Laura,

      My thoughts were also captured by the idea of a whole culture/or time being in a state of trauma, and yet I think each generation has their own traumas to deal with whether it is a war, a pandemic, the economy, communication, etc.) I wonder why our generations are not as equipped to handle these traumas when they appear in our lives? Do we not have the undergirding support and trust of others? Maybe the earlier generations also were traumatized and were poor equipped to deal with the situations also but they were never spoken of or written down because of shame/guilt. In either case, we need to know how to adequately not just identify the trauma but move toward healing out culture through individual healing. Deanna

       

       

    • #6109

      Joy Freeman
      Participant
      @jfreeman

      Laura and Deanna,

      You are asking many of the same questions I am. I see so much trauma on a cultural/societal level and so much less ability to deal with it. I also question does it seem like we are not able to deal with it, because we actually are aware of and see the many different things that are trauma for what they are, we understand more than previous generations, so while it seems they dealt with trauma better, it may be that they had “fewer identified” traumas to deal with where now we so many more things creating trauma? I don’t know just another question.

      Joy

    • #6110

      Laura Broadwater
      Participant
      @Laura

      Joy,

      As I recall WWII vets at death, the trauma was there, the recollection was there, there was a great need for confession, and a huge need to understand God’s grace.  There was also a deep abiding loyalty and duty in these previous generations.  I also reflect on my father in law who’s parents both died while he was so small.  He had determination and resiliency that motivated him to create a different and better life, to re-create a family to fill the needs of his own heart.  But his trauma was not something he vocalized, it was there as life ended, carried in his heart.  Trauma reared it’s memory in life transitions.  I imagine he and others moved forward from a deep abiding hope that life could be different.  I also encounter people who have experienced great trauma like: Sudan refugees, Burma refugees, others from Liberia; people who watch their families mutilated and destroyed.  There are some horrific stories, yet there is deep ingrained hope.  Perhaps it was some ritual that provided the coping skills, perhaps it was just theological themes. I imagine the responses will have great etiologies and diversity.

    • #6111

      Joy Freeman
      Participant
      @jfreeman

      Laura,

      I was not clear in my previous post. Past generations did have trauma – probably all the same ones that we identify now and others that were specific to their generation and time. What I was trying to not so elloquently comment on was what you just mentioned – the fact that past generations rarely talked about the traumas they went through – it just was not done and somewhere in that reluctance to talk we lost some wisdom in what they learned in how to be resilient. I think to some it may seem like we have more trauma today because it is more acceptable to talk about it, medicine and education are beginning to understand the impact trauma has and this conversation is raising the staggering amount of trauma that is in our society. And like you I think there is an element of hope involved and so part of me wonders how between the generations of our grandparents and generations of our future we lost that underlying since of abiding hope – at least in part it feels that way to me.

      Thank you for prompting me to think more deeply and clarify my previous post.

      Joy

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