9 replies, 5 voices Last updated by Jennifer Gingerich 2 years, 2 months ago
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    • #5225

      Jennifer Gingerich
      Member
      @JenniferGingerich

      All,

      I asked Lindsay to add two more files as a resources.  These explain another model of assessment that was not mentioned in the Drummond and Carey article.  I have found Monod et al’s Spiritual Distress Assessment Tool to be a helpful framework (and easier to remember than Pruyser’s and Fitchett’s rubrics).  I tend to use it more in reflecting on a conversation with a resident when I make notes, rather than shaping the conversation for assessment.  If you have a chance to take a look, you can share your thoughts on this model.

      Jennifer

    • #5231

      David
      Participant
      @Chaplain Brinker

      Can you direct us to where the resources are found?

    • #5233

      Rick Underwood
      Moderator
      @RickUnderwood

      David and all,

      The resources will be found on the course page where the overview, etc. are as soon as Lindsay can get them posted.

      Rick

    • #5234

      Jennifer Gingerich
      Member
      @JenniferGingerich

      The two documents I referenced are on the Week 1 page under the assigned readings.

    • #5235

      Orlow
      Member
      @Orlow

      Jennifer

      Thanks for adding these resources.  I just finished reading the Drummond and Carey article.  I found a lot of good points and look forward to think more deeply on many of the ideas for my Long term care context.  One point they made is certainly true and that is the age range in my  residents does make for a complex response to their expectations for understanding and response.  And as I am 66 years old it has been assumed by my leadership that I can’t relate to the generations much younger than myself.  I will say the challenge has been to cross the barriers of understanding through study and conversations and thinking through the contexts of the tv they watch and the online games that consume them.  Chaplaincy has been so rich and intriguing and will continue to be.

    • #5244

      Jennifer Gingerich
      Member
      @JenniferGingerich

      Orlow, it’s interesting that there is not too much concern about any of us relating to the residents in their 80s and 90s, but your leadership is still concerned about how you will relate to younger residents!  Actually my housing manager shared at some point after I was hired that she had worried about how I would connect with residents of color or different socio-economic status.  This is where our training in empathy and listening carefully to folks’ stories helps, right?  It sounds like you are working hard to do that.

      I’m curious, how do you go about designing programming or services that meet the preferences/needs of various age groups in your setting?  What does that end up looking like?

    • #5250

      llawhon
      Member
      @llawhon

      In my LTC setting you have to be at least 60 years old to move in.  We have several folks who are 1oo years or more.  At one point we had parents and their daughter and son in law living here.  It seems to me that the more folks we get on the younger end of the spectrum the more likely we are to see them as less connected to the faith of their childhood, many are less connected to organized religions.  The younger seem less likely to volunteer, including volunteering to assist in and around the chapel.  What I’m getting at is that, at least in my setting, we can no longer count on having a strong core of people with deep roots in a life long faith and less people who seem to want to volunteer to serve.  Increasingly it seems that we find more who want to be served and want what they want done for themselves rather than serving others.  So some of the things that I see as foundational in one’s spiritual life are less present among our newer, younger residents.  This calls for perhaps looking in some new directions or understanding some new language or practices which I may not be so familiar with causing me to have to sharpen some of my skills related to screening and assessing folks.  To help accomplish this I’m learning to listen more and ask things in a more open ended way to invite input and deeper conversation with folks who may differ widely from my own set of beliefs and practices.

    • #5253

      David
      Participant
      @Chaplain Brinker

      Spiritual Needs Model, Modon article: A Response
      This article gave me a glimpse into the working of a team of professionals creating an assessment tool for use in a hospital setting for geriatric patents. Initial thoughts brought me to wondering what it would be like to work with colleagues on a similar project? What would the challenges rewards be, etc.?

      Although I can see the expansive meanings, used to define the scope of “spirituality in elderly hospitalized persons” I am wondering if something if left out? I wondered by only beauty was mentioned as an aesthetic value. Is it possible for truth to have the same function for a person. In some cultures, I believe connectedness, creativity, harmony, or respect for elders holds a similar place for individuals.

      Spiritual Needs Model Chart: A Response
      There is a logic to the parallel comparison between spiritual needs and distress. As I haven’t seen many SDAT I am wondering if they all do this? The suggestion focus questions found in each category of the patient interview were helpful to me. My own sense of inadequacy is feeling I don’t know the questions which can take a conversation or an assessment in a direction of further self-disclosure. I have a few that I find myself falling back on but I appreciate having more to guide me and place in my tool box for use as needed. Admittedly, I have never conducted extensive assessments for spiritual distress. In this light, I haven’t analyzed interviews as suggested in the model. Nor have I quantified unmet needs numerically. Is this being done by colleagues in the forum

      David Brinker

    • #5261

      llawhon
      Member
      @llawhon

      David, in response to this sentence, “I have never conducted extensive assessments for spiritual distress. In this light, I haven’t analyzed interviews as suggested in the model. Nor have I quantified unmet needs numerically. Is this being done by colleagues in the forum”  I’m with you in that I don’t do much formal, extensive kind of assessments for spiritual distress and I really have a struggle with idea of trying to quantify to the work of the chaplain.  I used to do some per diem chaplaincy at our local hospital and they started asking the chaplains to keep track of how many visits, length of each and some sort of measure for the depth or significance of the problem addressed.  My experience tells me that some of our best work might come in the form of a brief, hallway conversation as opposed to a longer, more formal kind of conversation/intervention/interview.  I also know the opposite can be true in that it may take a longer time and more focused, structured questions to get to the heart of the matter.  These kind of realities cause me to question the value of trying to quantify our work.   Likewise, with assessments, in the LTC setting we have the opportunity to get to know people over the course of time and through the process of walking together through various crises and blessings.  This reality allows us to build an assessment, so to speak, rather than do an assessment.  In the moment of crisis some level of assessment may be needed but I’m just not sure that a one size fits all assessment is always going to be accurate.  Perhaps that leads to the question of do we need different assessments for different situations.  I don’t know that I have the answer for that.   Sorry, I’ve taken to rambling which may very well indicate that I really do struggle with the idea of trying to quantify and organize our work which is filled with the mysteries of God and spirituality and the complexities of human lives.  Maybe the ministry of presence is the best thing we can bring to the table.

    • #5265

      Jennifer Gingerich
      Member
      @JenniferGingerich

      Also responding to David’s observation and question about doing assessments, I sometimes do a less-formal analysis when I look back on a conversation with a resident to record information on a spiritual history/assessment that I keep for my own use (and that would provide some background to a chaplain that might follow me at some point).  I adapted someone else’s form to include a couple elements of the SDAT domains as a way of making sure I identified some of these concerns.  Ideally, I go back and update this form once in a while when there is significant new information that I have gleaned.  We are non-medical, so I do not have a place to chart a history or an assessment.

      I agree that for pastoral care purposes, our work is more fluid and less quantifiable.  I wonder if the numerical values assigned to levels of spiritual distress might be more helpful in interdisciplinary work, probably in a more acute setting.  Do any of you have experience on a palliative or hospice team in which the chaplain’s assessments are made available to other team members?  That subset of healthcare seems to be the most progressive (is that the word?) in including the spiritual component equally with other disciplines.

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