1 reply, 1 voice Last updated by Michael Porter 3 years, 5 months ago
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    • #3641

      Michael Porter
      Participant
      @mkporter

      I appreciated this article in that it shows that it raises up for doctors the need to be sensitive to and address the spiritual element of a person’s care.  In the opening section – Remembrance of Things Past – I connected with the statement “Profound healing is possible even when physical disease rages on and death is near.”  I connected with a person in the hospital when he was newly diagnosed with cancer.  He was afraid to die and was going for another opinion.  For three years he was in and out of the hospital and my relationship with him became stronger.  He shared that he was traveling to other places in the country, trying new medicines etc., hoping to find a cure.  When I saw him in the hospital, our conversation eventually turned to God.  He was not connected to a church, but he did share a relationship with God.  In the three years, I saw that relationship with God grow from an intellectual knowledge of God – which tied to his not wanting to die – to a heartfelt relationship with God.  He eventually came to the point where he still did not want to die, but it was not because he was afraid.  He wanted to share his story and his new found relationship with God with others.  He did die, but I believe he was healed.  I learned from another Oates seminar that healing can come in different ways and this is an example of that.

      I agree that “Many doctors are embarrassed to consider a patient’s spirituality …”  Because doctors have traditionally worked in an “applied science” the spiritual may be outside of their comfort zone.  The article mentions that doctors would benefit from taking a form of CPE as part of their training.  I agree, but not as if teaching or honing skills.  CPE for me was more about learning about myself and my baggage, which hindered my being present with people.  I realized that God has given me the gifts for this ministry- and yes they were honed – but until I was able to realize and understand how my stuff got in the way and deal with that, was I able to use those gifts more fully.  I believe God has called me to this ministry and has given me the gifts to do it.  Doctors are called to what they do and are given gifts to do it.  The spiritual element within them needs to be opened up and nurtured to enable them to better help the people they serve.

      I have some other comments to make on this article, but have run out of time.  This has been one of those weeks where I have had very little down time because of multiple codes and patient care.  Hopefully tomorrow I will be able to post more.

      Until then, peace.

      Mike

    • #3644

      Michael Porter
      Participant
      @mkporter

      This is a continuation of my reflections on Deep Doctoring.

      I appreciate Rotella raising up the two functions of the spiritual assessment and the use of the SPIRITual History tool.  I address what she presents in the SPIRIT model and this puts a structure to putting together the information.

      Rotella says, “Doctors may also increase their sensitivity to spiritual concerns through participation in multidisciplinary teams with medical chaplains, including hospice teams.”  One of the roles of the Chaplain is to do that – to raise the spiritual issues and how those issues may affect a person’s health.

      From another Oates seminar I gained a clearer understanding of the difference between hospice care and palliative care.  Hospice care is care given to a dying person to ensure the person has the best quality of life through the dying process.  Palliative care is the care a person with a chronic illness to ensure the person has the best quality of life while continuing on with life.   Members of my organization have tried for fifteen years to develop a palliative care program for our hospital.  We have gotten it to the point where a Nurse Practitioner needed to be hired to oversee the program.  The program was scrapped for lack of funding.  So many times I see beneficial programs that are good for the care of people are not implemented for financial reasons.  Doctors are not the only ones who need to be sensitive to spiritual well-being, all people of the hospital including administration (and the corporate structure) need to be sensitive to the spiritual needs of people who come for care.

      Mike

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