2 replies, 2 voices Last updated by Michael Porter 3 years, 5 months ago
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    • #3591

      Michael Porter
      Participant
      @mkporter

      Hello All,

      This is a great article and presents what health care needs to be about.  As I read the article I was thinking it is too good to be true.  Taking care of the whole person is essential to restore health.  The Catholic Health Initiatives are on target to make this happen.  Health Care is a team effort involving all disciplines to care for people.  To accomplish this is huge and I wonder – Where do we start?  The teams I work with seem to focus on their area and as the Chaplain I help keep the whole person perspective on the table.

      I particularly like the section on Relationship-Centered Care for  the Patients and Families where the clinical narrative is discussed.  Entering into a relationship with patients through dialogue is key.  Getting a person to tell his or her story gives that personal perspective.  As I visit with people I engage them by having them tell their story, which informs me where they are at in their situation.  Listening to their story brings them a sense that they are cared for and valued.

      How long have these Catholic Health Initiatives been in place?  With Dierdre, I too wonder how successful this has been?

      Mike

       

      Mike

       

    • #3605

      Dierdre Jarrett
      Participant
      @Dierdrej

      Mike,

      I hadn’t thought of my role as the one who keeps the “whole person perspective on the table” as you phrase it but I suppose in many cases that is true. Too often our care team treats patients as diagnosis or a room number instead of a person. When I find out something particularly relevant like a recent loss, or other issue that may be impeding their healing I do share it with the team, first asking permission from the patient. I try to connect the dots for the staff too – I don’t remember where I read it but I remember hearing that we only function at about 70-80 percent after a loss. When someone shares with me they have had a loss I share that with him/her so they know it is not surprising they are having a hard time or don’t feel like themselves, few do after a loss.  Can you share more about what strategies you try to keep the whole person’s perspective on the table?

      Blessings,

      Dierdre

    • #3612

      Michael Porter
      Participant
      @mkporter

      Dierdre,

      As part of the care team I do not believe getting permission to share pertinent information for somebodies care is needed to share with the care team.  For instance in the story I shared, I shared with the person’s nurse what I learned, which helped the nurse be more supportive for the person.  I let the person know I would share the information with her nurse and care team.  I the person questions that, we can dialogue about how it would benefit care and healing.

      We have daily multidisciplinary care conferences about the people in the ICU.  I make regular rounds in the ICU and interact with people and their family members to try and alleviate the thinking that the Chaplain comes only when things are bad.  I share insights I have gained from with the care team as appropriate.

      I work at referring to people as people not patients – for instance a person with cancer, not a cancer patient – a person with cardiac issues, not a cardiac patient etc.  For me this keeps the human element up front.

      Mike

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