#5965

Lisa Wood
Participant
@LisaWood

Rick’s article and the Middleton powerpoint complement each other in clinical and pastoral application.   I need to clarify (for myself) the term “emotional resources” in the context of Rick’s sentence:  <span style=”font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-size: medium;”>Christina Maslach in Burnout, defines burnout as a psychological syndrome of emotional exhaustion (feelings of being emotionally overextended & depleted of</span><span style=”font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-size: medium;”> </span><span style=”font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; background-color: yellow;”>emotional resources</span><span style=”font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-size: medium;”>), depersonalization (negative & cynical detached response to others & may include a loss of idealism) and reduced personal accomplishment (decline in feeling of competence & productivity at work).</span><span style=”font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-size: medium;”> </span>

Additionally, in his illustration using “Jim,” Rick writes, “..<span style=”font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-size: medium;”>He poured himself into the job but he wasn’t very open to the feedback about how to do things better…” </span><span style=”font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-size: medium;”> I wonder whether Jim’s not being open to feedback is a personality trait, or an acquired defense mechanism he’s developed from having been unfairly or inappropriately criticized in the past – either in the workplace, or in his personal life.</span>

Regarding the Middleton article, I was struck by the idea of the u<span style=”font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-size: medium;”>nrealistic expectation that I can be “immersed” in pain and suffering of others daily and not be affected by it.</span><span style=”font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-size: medium;”> </span><span style=”font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-size: medium;”> The question of “</span><span style=”font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-size: medium;”>Soooooo, what are my resources for coping/processing it?” were met with practical, albeit somewhat unfamiliar methods for that coping/processing and managing the ill effects. </span><span style=”font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-size: medium;”>The idea of an “ethical imperative” not to be harmed or to damage others by the work we do is profound.  I just have to wonder… </span><i style=”font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000;”>What would that “damage” look like in the people with whom we do pastoral care/counseling.</i>
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