#4245

Thank you Rose.  Lovely quote “…no greater mission than to walk another human being home to God.”  Good reminder even when it is hard to see.

Wally–you are right–where were all of the mourners at the nursing home.  I have a friend in a care facility in another state.  I so miss being able to see her, even with her memory issues.

I found the Primer reading so very helpful as reminders.

I appreciated the closing line of the paragraph on page 26–‘Trusting in God’s guidance, we realize that the encounter is not by chance but by design.’   Several times I’ve been rounding and encountered someone say “I was just going to call you.  How did you know we needed you?”  Truly, thankful for God’s prompting to be of help and service.

The question at the end of chapter 2–when did I feel the love of Christ communicated without words?  In summer of ’17, while at Boy Scout Jamboree, my husband collapsed with cardiac arrest.  After procedures at one hospital–he was transferred to another hospital in West Virginia.  When I finally arrived from Texas, a friend had called a local congregation to provide support to me and my husband.  A chaplain from the Jamboree also was great support–and still is. The first few days my husband was critical–I remember saying to 1-2 people, “I don’t know if I will be able to take him home.”  This lovely part time youth minister just let me talk  and cry and listened.  He prayed with me.  If he said words, I don’t remember any of them.    He was there and I knew God was there.    (So I don’t leave you hanging, my husband’s recovery was amazing and his nurses call him their Miracle Man–he is back at work, volunteering as a firefighter and this past fall continued to referee high school football.  We are grateful every day!)

Chapter 3 –“Throughout history, the predominant image of the Christian caregiver has been that of the shepherd.”  As I read, I’ve continued to wonder about my own imagery of care-giving.  For me, I continue to think of Mary and Martha.

<span class=”verse” style=”box-sizing: border-box; display: inline; cursor: pointer; font-family: Roboto; outline: 0px !important; font-size: 1.3em !important;”><span style=”box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bold; display: inline-block; margin-right: 3px; margin-left: 5px;”>38</span> <span id=”verse-38″ style=”box-sizing: border-box;”>As Jesus and his disciples were on their way, he came to a village where a woman named Martha opened her home to him.</span> </span><span class=”verse” style=”box-sizing: border-box; display: inline; cursor: pointer; font-family: Roboto; outline: 0px !important; font-size: 1.3em !important;”><span style=”box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bold; display: inline-block; margin-right: 3px; margin-left: 5px;”>39</span> <span id=”verse-39″ style=”box-sizing: border-box;”>She had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet listening to what he said.</span> </span><span class=”verse” style=”box-sizing: border-box; display: inline; cursor: pointer; font-family: Roboto; outline: 0px !important; font-size: 1.3em !important;”><span style=”box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bold; display: inline-block; margin-right: 3px; margin-left: 5px;”>40</span> <span id=”verse-40″ style=”box-sizing: border-box;”>But Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made. She came to him and asked, “Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help me!”</span> </span><span class=”verse” style=”box-sizing: border-box; display: inline; cursor: pointer; font-family: Roboto; outline: 0px !important; font-size: 1.3em !important;”><span style=”box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bold; display: inline-block; margin-right: 3px; margin-left: 5px;”>41</span> <span id=”verse-41″ style=”box-sizing: border-box;”>“Martha, Martha,” the Lord answered, “you are worried and upset about many things,</span> </span><span class=”verse” style=”box-sizing: border-box; display: inline; cursor: pointer; font-family: Roboto; outline: 0px !important; font-size: 1.3em !important;”><span style=”box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bold; display: inline-block; margin-right: 3px; margin-left: 5px;”>42</span> <span id=”verse-42″ style=”box-sizing: border-box;”>but few things are needed—or indeed only one.Mary has chosen what is better, and it will not be taken away from her.”</span></span>

I know that Jesus reminded the sisters that Martha needed to calm and just be with Jesus as Mary was.  And maybe I’m interpreting inaccurately, but I believe that we need both Marthas and Marys in care-giving.  Sometimes there are practical ways to show care to others–calling their local congregation, providing communion or baptism.  And then sometimes we are called to stop and be with the patient and or family as Mary was with Jesus.  I see now in the re-reading this translation, Martha was distracted.  That may be the key–rather than focus on the basics of bread and wine, she was focused on the nice tablecloth and multi-course meal.

All of the examples provided in the chapter and in our discussion were helpful.